What is the difference between fog and clouds Class 6?

What is the difference between fog and clouds Class 6?

The major differences between one and the other are that fog is much thicker and denser than mist. They both consist of clouds that are made of condensed water vapour….

Difference between Fog and Mist
The visibility in fog is lower when compared to mist The visibility in mist is higher when compared to fog

What is a cloud Short answer?

The Short Answer: Clouds are created when water vapor, an invisible gas, turns into liquid water droplets. These water droplets form on tiny particles, like dust, that are floating in the air. These energetic molecules then escape from the liquid water in the form of gas.

What is fog and cloud an example?

Fog, clouds, mist are examples of aerosol. An aerosol is a colloid of fine solid particles or liquid droplets, in air or another gas.

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What is the difference between fog mist and cloud?

Water vapour that condenses high in the atmosphere is called a cloud. Water vapour that condenses close to the earth surface is called fog or mist.

What is fog Class 9?

Fog is a visible aerosol consisting of tiny water droplets or ice crystals suspended in the air at or near the Earth’s surface. Fog can be considered a type of low-lying cloud usually resembling stratus, and is heavily influenced by nearby bodies of water, topography, and wind conditions.

What is fog in science?

Fog is a cloud that touches the ground. Fog shows up when water vapor, or water in its gaseous form, condenses. During condensation, molecules of water vapor combine to make tiny liquid water droplets that hang in the air. You can see fog because of these tiny water droplets. Water vapor, a gas, is invisible.

What kind of cloud is fog?

stratus clouds
Fog: Layer of stratus clouds on or near the ground. Different types include radiation fog (forms overnight and burns off in the morning) and advection fog.

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What would happen if you touched a cloud?

Well, the simple answer is yes, but we will get into it. Clouds look like they would be fluffy and fun to play in, but they are actually made of trillions “cloud droplets”. Nonetheless, if you were to be able to touch a cloud, it wouldn’t really feel like anything, just a little wet.

Is cloud and fog the same?

The Short Answer: Clouds and fog both form when water vapor condenses or freezes to form tiny droplets or crystals in the air, but clouds can form at many different altitudes while fog only forms near the ground.

What type of cloud is fog?

How is fog computing different from cloud computing?

To me, the difference between Fog Computing and Cloud Computing is where and why processing is being done. Cloud computing typically takes place in a backend data center, with data being distributed from more or less centralized resources (e.g. compute, storage) to consumers on the edge of the network.

What is fog made of?

Fog is a visible aerosol consisting of tiny water droplets or ice crystals suspended in the air at or near the Earth ‘s surface. Fog can be considered a type of low-lying cloud usually resembling stratus, and is heavily influenced by nearby bodies of water, topography, and wind conditions.

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How does fog form?

Fog forms when the difference between ambient temperature and dew point is generally less than 2.5° C. Fog begins to form when water vapor condenses into tiny liquid water droplets in the air. The main ways water vapor is added to the air: wind convergence into areas of upward motion, daytime heating evaporating water from the surface of oceans, water bodies or wet land, transpiration from plants, cool or dry air moving over warmer water, and lifting air over mountains.

How is fog formed?

Radiation Fog. The Earth’s surface absorbs heat from the sun during the day,and at night it radiates that heat back into space.

  • Advection Fog. People living on the West Coast of North America are familiar with the fog banks that blow in from the Pacific Ocean.
  • Other Types of Fog.